Category: Law

Law Schools in Canada: Writings of the First Toronto Law Dean W.P.M. Kennedy (2)

My purposes in this article are narrowed to two points : (i) a statement of the teaching of law subjects in Canadian Universities for purposes and aims other than those to which Dean Falconbridge has done full justice ; (ii) to outline the work with which I am most familiar, in the University of Toronto.

Thomas Jefferson: How Law Should be Part of a Broad Training in the Liberal Arts

I find it interesting sometimes to contrast the narrow, vocational-based education system we have today with the kind of education system envisaged in the late 1700s. Often, the aim back then was to receive a broad-education in what today we understand as the liberal arts and sciences, before advancing onto a broad education as to ...

Law as a social science: Toronto Law School and WPM Kennedy

In the process of writing my PhD, I have stumbled upon the writings of WPM Kennedy, the former Dean of Toronto Law School and writer of 'Law as a Social Science'. Writing in the 1930s, Kennedy believed that law should not be taught as a mere vocation or trade, but as a "fundamental social science." ...

Lifetime Employment in Japan: Casual Work, Part-Time Work and Women under Equal Opportunity Law

Lifetime employment has long been the cornerstone of corporate governance in Japan. College graduates at large firms have traditionally been guaranteed employment until retirement. These graduates, almost exclusively men, are guaranteed job security in return for complete loyalty to their company of choice. Originally sustained by cultural forces of “loyalty” and collectivism, the lifetime employment ...

The Role of the Corporate Mega Firm

This article discusses the role of the corporate mega-firm in shaping the dreams, aspirations, and ambitions of Australian law students. In sum, I argue that students begin law school with clear social and moral convictions and leave as apolitical, passive enforcers of the law, unable to question the legal rules and principles they have been ...

Legal education- success but at what cost?

The following is a review of my book by Edwin Montoya Zorrila from the blog, Notes From The Wreck.   I preface this review with a disclosure. The author, Joshua Krook, is a friend of mine, and we have studied law together at the University of Sydney. I have also supported this book by helping ...

The “Employer’s Voice” in Australian Legal Education

‘The Employer’s Voice’ Shaping Graduate Attributes: In the early 1990s, Australian universities were placed under increasing pressure from ‘the state, industry and other agencies’ to produce graduates who possessed specific market-relevant skills.[i] By the mid-2000s universities had enshrined graduate attributes at the core of their teaching objectives.[ii] Now it is common to see graduate attributes ...