The Oxford Political Review: An Interview with Brian Wong

I had the chance to sit down and have an interview with Brian Wong, the founder of the Oxford Political Review. Our chat took us on a wild journey through modern media, digital platforms, online polarisation and the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. I was left wondering... is there hope for online media after all? Thanks for ...

The Philosophy of Byung-Chul Han

In the 1980s, there were a series of writers who challenged the way people thought of the then-growing popularity of colour television and news media. I have written before about Neil Postman, and his fear of our world becoming a 'trivial society' and Marshall McLuhan, who warned us that 'the medium is the message'. (Technology ...

Sydney in Lockdown

Bondi beach is an icon. It’s one of the first places people visit when they tour Sydney. It’s known to be busy at all times. In mid-winter, you can find people jogging along its famous cliff walk, trailing along the edge of the sea. Today, the beach is closed. The cliff walk is closed. The ...

It Ends in Suits (How Law Firms Buy the Best Students)

It's 2016 and I'm at a networking event run by one of the major law firms in Sydney, Australia. Around me, canapés are being served by waiters in tuxedos. They ask me if I would like the salmon tartar. I politely decline. It's a formal event, so I am dressed in my one and only ...

Australia’s Bushfire Crisis

It is difficult to talk about the current bushfire crisis facing Australia with anything close to the objectivity required of a journalistic article. As my home, I have struggled to come to grips with the scope of the disaster that has occurred here. For a long time, we have had the benefit of sitting on ...

Before you go to law school… read this (Or: Should I go to law school?)

So you want to go to law school.  You’ve spent years watching legal dramas, stomach tingling at every argument spoken in a Hollywood courtroom. You’ve honed your skills in argumentation, practicing on your parents, siblings and intellectually inferior friends. You’ve trodden through the history books, digging out biographies of Nelson Mandela, Gandhi and Jefferson. You ...

How to Fix Law Schools in Australia: A Few Recommendations

For the last three years, I have been writing a PhD on how to fix legal education in Australia. The core of my thesis has been the creation of a new liberal arts law school curriculum, addressing concerns that the current curriculum is too "corporate" or "vocational" in focus. Below are the key recommendations from ...

How To Get a Job As a Generalist

I've had various people write to me following the release of my TEDx video earlier in the year. The most common question by far has been about how to get employed as a generalist. Often, the person concerned has built up a diverse range of skills, experiences and knowledge bases and wants to know how to ...

Lawyers in the Media: A Comparison of American and Australian Representations of Justice

In 1984, international human rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson shot the first episode of his critically acclaimed Hypotheticals TV series on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (‘the ABC’).[1] The show was a landmark of its time. In each episode, Robertson posed a series of hypothetical questions to a panel of high-profile public officials: politicians, police chiefs, community ...

Why Do Tech Companies Want to Read Our Minds? (Brain-computer interfaces, surgical implants and the end of privacy)

We are free to think whatever we want. From a young age, we are told that no one else can know what we are thinking. Someone can study our actions, our facial expressions and our body language, but they can never know for sure what we are thinking. Our thoughts are private and secure, and ...

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