All posts by Joshua Krook

Joshua Krook is an author and thinker interested in law, social psychology, video game design and the pitfalls of specialization. He is currently pursuing a PhD on the creation of a liberal arts law school, dedicated to the teaching of law as a humanities subject, with skepticism, critical thinking and the 'Real' Socratic method at the core of teaching. Josh regularly speaks at university events and forums on issues of politics and culture, empathy, law, vocational education, and the reformulation of today’s employment system. Outside of writing, Josh owns his own video game development company, Atreyu Games, which aims to tell interactive stories as a form of video game literature. Follow him on twitter: @JoshKrook

Lawyers in the Media: A Comparison of American and Australian Representations of Justice

In 1984, international human rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson shot the first episode of his critically acclaimed Hypotheticals TV series on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (‘the ABC’).[1] The show was a landmark of its time. In each episode, Robertson posed a series of hypothetical questions to a panel of high-profile public officials: politicians, police chiefs, community ...

Why Do Tech Companies Want to Read Our Minds? (Brain-computer interfaces, surgical implants and the end of privacy)

We are free to think whatever we want. From a young age, we are told that no one else can know what we are thinking. Someone can study our actions, our facial expressions and our body language, but they can never know for sure what we are thinking. Our thoughts are private and secure, and ...

How Australia Became a Conservative Nation

The year is 2014 and Tony Abbott, the Australian Prime Minister, announces a series of cuts to public spending across healthcare, education and unemployment benefits. Modeled off of the austerity programs sweeping Europe at the time, the cuts aimed to balance the federal budget and privatize public services. The UK, Greece, Spain and Portugal have all adopted ...

4 Ways to Innovate: Lessons from the Global Scholars Symposium

In June 2019, Rhodes House hosted the Global Scholars Symposium. The theme was Cultivating Innovation. Over the two-day event, speakers from all over the world talked about different ways to innovate. I left the event with a newfound appreciation for innovators, and several take-home messages. According to the dictionary, to innovate is to “make changes in ...

There is a Logical Fallacy at the Heart of the Case Method

This post was originally from the Oxford Political Review here. Since the late 1800s, the best law schools in common law countries have taught law by way of the case method. Invented by Professor Christopher Columbus at Harvard Law School, the case method is based on the idea that law can be understood by reading ...

Fireworks Fly at Jeff Koons Event: Should An Artist Credit Their Assistants?

Fireworks flew in question time yesterday at an event celebrating the internationally acclaimed artist Jeff Koons. Visiting Oxford to promote his exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Koons was questioned by the Emeritus Professor of Art History Martin Kemp, before receiving mostly hostile questions from the live audience. Koons is best known for his reproduction of ...

Can Bernie Sanders become the President of the United States?

In a years' time, several books will come out chronicling the 2020 U.S. Presidential election, asking several key questions: what went right, what went wrong, what policy succeeded and what failed? Among the core contenders, Bernie Sanders stands out as someone who is at once authentic and passionate about his beliefs. A cursory glance at ...